Posts in category: ‘3D Printing’

The next generation of manufacturing leaders

As an industrial nation, manufacturing in the United States has experienced times of progress, beginning with the Industrial Revolution and continuing with post war booms. It’s also been decimated by the offshoring of manufacturing facilities and, course, jobs. We stand now, however, on the edge of tremendous changes fueled by new ideas, new technologies, and new needs. I spoke to two experts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to understand how the next generation of manufacturing leaders is being trained, and the opportunities that stand in front of them.

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Higher education needs to catch up

When we think of the adoption of new technology, our minds might think of colleges and university standing with open arms. But there’s something happening, or more accurately not happening, in some engineering departments – the curriculum just is not keeping pace with the current state of additive manufacturing.

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Meetup recap: “The role of additive manufacturing/professional 3D printing in education.”

Last week we hosted September’s Community meetup and, as usual, it was both both fun (there’s free pizza – it’s hard to be sad around free pizza) and informative. Our theme was “The role of additive manufacturing/professional 3D printing in education.” We were fortunate to have three speakers who knew their stuff – Elaine Kristant from Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Tasker Smith technical instructor at MIT’s Pappalardo Undergraduate Laboratory, and one of our own product managers, Blake Reeves. If you couldn’t attend or didn’t have time to check out the live feed, here’s a quick recap.

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3D Printing: target education

The 3D printing industry has a history of some 32 years. Within that (relatively) short period of time the technology base has established itself as a critical tool within many vertical manufacturing sectors for product development and, more recently, production.

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