Posts in category: ‘CAD COLLABORATION’

The amazing, fantabulous, bewildering world of cloud CAD: application delivery

Invocation of the word “cloud” has now reached a saturation point among CAD circles. Any CAD vendor without some sort of cloud strategy by now would be wise to run -not walk- to the nearest clue dispensing station. Cloud is becoming less of a counterculture alternative, but rather an essential piece of every current and future CAD solution.

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The amazing, fantabulous, bewildering world of cloud CAD: Infrastructure

"Cloud" is now a household word in today's engineering software landscape. That's both good and bad. Good in that new technology is actively being sought and aggressively adopted for CAD applications, bad in that the term places a whimsically diverse range of development, delivery, infrastructure, and virtualization technologies under one fantastically generic umbrella. So when it comes to cloud CAD, there's naturally quite a bit of consternation over whether your particular flavor of cloud-enabled CAD software might be pure, true, or perhaps even fluffy enough.

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How design democratization leads to graphical commoditization

When you associate the state of CAD graphics to an alien conspiracy it just might incite a cheer, conversely perhaps a bit of rage, or in the very best case thoughtful commentary from a lagomorph well versed in computational geometry. The crux of my original article was not to convict or condemn, but rather to warn that the continually evolving CAD universe, and by association professional CAD graphics, is on the precipice of something here unto unforeseen and unimagined. It might seem like the end of all things. Something disconcerting enough that a forlorn and distraught Samwise Gamgee might longingly implore, "Don't professional graphics matter, Mr. Frodo?" For which our brave hobbit might reply: "They do Sam, they do. But not for me."

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APIs, GPUs, and drivers: CAD graphical conspiracy?

Graphics performance is no doubt key to CAD productivity. Common recommendations involve running up the bill with professional level GPUs in certified hardware configurations. But is such a setup a wise investment? Hardware and software vendors tout how certified professional graphics cards are all that, and throw down the benchmarks to prove it. Many CAD hardware enthusiasts, however, contend that pro cards are perhaps an alien conspiracy designed to empty your pockets, and that consumer-grade gaming GPUs are up to the task at a fraction of the cost. The truth in the bewildering world of CAD graphics is complicated. But it’s out there. You see a pattern emerging here, Scully?

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Will the next CAD be a game?

Shall we play a game? Aside from global thermonuclear war, that is. Regardless of your particular opinion on cloud delivery, subscription models, and military supercomputers named after Burger King sandwiches, CAD is becoming widely accessible to both classically trained engineers and non-engineers alike. With such newfound exposure, an interesting challenge arises. Is there a potential to further harness the creativity of everyone into engineering design? And how does that affect what we know as engineering? Might the next evolution of CAD evolve into a game? It's not quite as ridiculous as it might sound.

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How to hand off a project without infuriating the next engineer

Handing off a project to another engineer can be daunting. Aside from the personal attachment (the project is your baby), it can be difficult to articulate where the project has been and where it needs to go. My background is in design engineering for the retail fixture industry, so I have worked for companies that are project based, not product based.

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How should engineers work with graphic designers?

Engineers are an analytical bunch. Function always comes before form. Take street signs, for example. Virtually all of these signs were written in all capital letters. This didn't change until recently - when research proved that that a combination of uppercase and lowercase characters is easier for the elderly to read. Now, signs are being replaced with the easier to read text. The engineers at the Federal Highway Administration didn’t make the decision to switch to a more attractive type until someone provided research that proves that it’s easier to read.

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