Posts in category: ‘Career Development’

Your Next Project: What’s in it for me?

When starting a new project it's easy to get bogged down in the minutia of the repeated aspects of accomplishing your job or task. But, have you ever stepped back and asked what's in it for me in this project? What am I gaining and learning from tackling this project? Sure the pay, or joy of completing a project is rewarding, but growing your skill base and developing yourself can be even more rewarding.

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Effecting Change at Work, or How to Engineer a Better Outcome

“The only thing that is constant is change.” Heraclitus 500BCE

I live and work in what is known as “Silicon Valley.” Not really any different than any other densely populated industrial high-tech area, other than the fact that just like the Hollywood of the 1930’s, Silicon Valley has a national reputation for “opportunity.” If you have an idea for a service or a product that might fill a need (even if it is a very narrow niche need), there is enough money floating locally to create a “startup.”

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Engineering Advice: Experts Often Possess More Data Than Judgment

It feels like I started my current job just yesterday. I was 23 years old, just a few months out of school, looking to start a new career at a new company. I blinked – and it’s almost 30 years later and instead of being the youngest engineer in the technical group, I am one of the “old guys” who is much closer to retirement than 95 percent of my co-workers.  But, if I've learned one thing over my 30-year career and can offer some engineering career advice, it's that experts aren't formed just be career longevity. 

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Five Mistakes New Engineers Should Avoid for Long-Term Success

In 1970, tire manufacturer Firestone recalled 10 million tires. A faulty engineering design separated the belt from the tread: the rubber on the circumference that makes contact with the road. Unfortunately, it took dozens of accidents to recognize the manufacturing defect.

New engineers need to understand their mistakes can have serious consequences. If you want to move up the career ladder swiftly, the room for error is slim to none (actually none).

Here are five mistakes new engineers should avoid if they want to gain long-term success.

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