Posts in category: ‘Engineering Management’

The Top Three Universities to Attend for a Manufacturing Engineering Degree

So you’re thinking of studying manufacturing engineering at university? You’ve come to the right place! Your first questions might be: what is manufacturing engineering? What does that really mean?

Well, qualified manufacturing engineers essentially turn design into reality, ensuring products retain their functionality amidst the glamour of impressive design. Manufacturing engineers oversee how products are manufactured to exact specifications in the most time and cost efficient way possible, so that products can reach businesses and consumers worldwide.
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6 Tips On Getting Funding for Your Engineering Research

Research is essential for advancement. However, finding proper funding for it is hard. Most researchers need it - doctoral students, postgraduates, senior researchers and so on.

Even though governments and charities offer money, there are still too many researchers for that funding to be enough. That’s why you need to learn to find and apply for funding on your own. Here is how:

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Effecting Change at Work, or How to Engineer a Better Outcome

“The only thing that is constant is change.” Heraclitus 500BCE

I live and work in what is known as “Silicon Valley.” Not really any different than any other densely populated industrial high-tech area, other than the fact that just like the Hollywood of the 1930’s, Silicon Valley has a national reputation for “opportunity.” If you have an idea for a service or a product that might fill a need (even if it is a very narrow niche need), there is enough money floating locally to create a “startup.”

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For Hardware Entrepreneurs and Startups, What Opportunities and Benefits Do “Smart Manufacturing” and “Industry 4.0” Offer?

From the idea of interchangeable parts popularized in the United States by Eli Whitney for muskets and Henry Ford's mass production techniques to Japan's "kaizen" (continuous improvement) methodologies, and techniques like LEAN and AGILE, manufacturers are always on the lookout for ways to improve – increase yields, shorten raw-materials-to-finished-product times, reduce waste, and more.

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Why You Should Streamline Network Coordination Between Engineering and Production

The main goal of all manufacturing companies is to deliver the product on time to the customer.

Sounds simple, yes, but it is not. You can create the greatest design, but it will be worthless if it includes expensive parts or parts you cannot get on time. Long lead times means risk to production milestones. Think about two important activities for every manufacturing company:  1) designing a great product and 2) purchasing parts and outsourcing the work to subcontractors. These processes are heavily intertwined and require coordination (which is often lacking in existing tools) and transparency.

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Five Mistakes New Engineers Should Avoid for Long-Term Success

In 1970, tire manufacturer Firestone recalled 10 million tires. A faulty engineering design separated the belt from the tread: the rubber on the circumference that makes contact with the road. Unfortunately, it took dozens of accidents to recognize the manufacturing defect.

New engineers need to understand their mistakes can have serious consequences. If you want to move up the career ladder swiftly, the room for error is slim to none (actually none).

Here are five mistakes new engineers should avoid if they want to gain long-term success.

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